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20130115
20130123
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he
in and attacked that. now, in my opinion that wasn't partisan. it was his vision of america. as lyndon johnson had a vision of the great society. it wasn't anti-republican. it was his vision. john kennedy, the new frontier. i think the president from the way i was taking it was saying i think b this is the vision america needs to go in. but it wasn't for just four years. he said we're not talking four months, four years, or 400 years. >> that's exactly right. and you played the clip talking about how the social safety net allows us to take risks and not fear the failure. other countries don't have that. i spent a lot of time in india where there was such a fear of taking on new initiatives and being entrepreneurial because there wasn't that same safety net in place. that is the progressive vision. let's be real. paul ryan, here's a guy who supports privatizing social security, voucherizing medicare. so the president is not putting up a strawman argument. these are exactly the principles that republicans support. and also republicans have never been comfortable with social security and medicare. th
him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said yeah we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything but
he utilize the power, the threat of power of the presidency the way lyndon johnson did with regard to resolutions during the course of the vietnam war? one senator voting against him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district, call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called, lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number
that polarization? >> you know what, lyndon johnson opened up the war on immigration in appalachia. most poor people are white, female and young, and black and brown hunger hurts. 50 million, these people are malnourished, homeless or wandering. they're unbankable, therefore they're driven into expensive loan arrangements. they are poor. they cannot send their children to school. they cannot dream. 50 million more very close to them, this impact of growing poverty and racial polarization and violence is a hell of a combination, and i would think that now we must in substance take a hard look at poverty. and some plan for economic reconstruction. look at places like inglewood, the president organized, london or austin, 45% unemployment. 50% unemployment. must be some targeted jobs planning and, of course, it's cheaper to educate than incarcerate. >> i remember most poignant memories about election night was a picture of you with tears streaming down your cheeks there in grand park, and i'm wondering if you have the same sort of combination of joy and hope that that expressed to me about the next four
-- lyndon johnson filed it once in his six years. i filed it 390 some odd times. so we've got to change that. if you invoke that on a piece of legislation, people get 30 hours to sit around and do nothing. i want to get rid of that. i think we should not have the 30-hours post. and i think that we have to make sure that on a regular piece of legislation, if somebody wants to continue objecting to it after it's been invoked they should have to stand and talk. there should be a talking filibuster. >> okay. so there's -- can you explain this 30-hour thing? i think that -- in the grand scheme of things is the most egregious which is, you know, filibustering the motion to proceed and then, there's this weird kind of period after you filibuster with motion to proceed where it's mandated no one can do anything? >> well, there are two familiar low periods. first is when eye file the 16 senators file a motion that moves towards kloture and that's two full working days and then you have the vote and if you achieve, you're cutting off debate, then there's a 30-hour period that follows after that. and t
that you mentioned, but lyndon baines johnson and other presidents that in the second term things happen o outside of their reach, and he needs to be cognizant of history. >> thank you both for being here in person. >> happy inauguration. >> and yes. nice glasses. did you get them just for the inauguration. >> no, i didn't, but thank you. >> let's get going on the hearings and benghazi that are going to be happening this week, and congresswoman karen bass sits on the house foreign relations committee that will hear secretary clinton's testimony and joining me live now. always a pleasure, congresswoman. >> thank you. thanks for having me on. >> both of the senate and the house will hear from secretary clinton for the first time on benghazi, and what do you want to hear from secretary clinton? >> well, first of all, it is number one, good to see her and wish her the best. i am glad to know that she is feeling better, but i have to tell you that the state department has already put out a report that has identified 29 areas of recommendations, and we did have a hearing on benghazi just a few w
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)